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397,848 notes

sarahseemssilly:

theycallmethemoose:

everkings:

gildatheplant:

pragtastic:

fifty-shades-of-gandalf-the-grey:

leomoriat:

poesdaughter:

Or, y’know, that thing called “Passover.”

Or the whole thing with Noah’s Ark where he killed off everything in the world except Noah and his family, and two of every animal. Y’know, no big deal. Just millions of people.

90% of the Old Testament is about God killing people in temper tantrums

Are we not going to mention Jesus?

Nailed it.

*wheeze* 

Oh my god.

Nailed it.

sarahseemssilly:

theycallmethemoose:

everkings:

gildatheplant:

pragtastic:

fifty-shades-of-gandalf-the-grey:

leomoriat:

poesdaughter:

Or, y’know, that thing called “Passover.”

Or the whole thing with Noah’s Ark where he killed off everything in the world except Noah and his family, and two of every animal. Y’know, no big deal. Just millions of people.

90% of the Old Testament is about God killing people in temper tantrums

Are we not going to mention Jesus?

Nailed it.

*wheeze* 

Oh my god.

Nailed it.

(Source: atheismblog, via writingfish)

Filed under hilarity religion

485 notes

libutron:

The Elephant yam - A striking aroid used as food, fodder and medical
Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Alismatales - Araceae) is a large aroid, which is found throughout Asia. In the wild it is ruderal in habit and grows in a very wide range of moist, semi-shaded to open, secondary and disturbed forests, shrublands, scrubs and grasslands. It is also cultivated as an ornamental for its striking compound foliage and unusual and dramatic flowering and fruiting structures.
The plant produces a single inflorescence (flowering spike) crowned with a bulbous maroon knob and encircled by a fleshy maroon and green-blotched bract. After the growing season, this dies back to an underground storage organ (tuber).
Commonly known as Elephant yam, it is one of the staple food plants of tropical Asia, and is extensively cultivated for its edible tubers, which are the third most important carbohydrate source after rice and maize in Indonesia. They are also consumed widely in India and Sri Lanka, although elsewhere they are seen as a famine crop, to be used when more popular staples, such as rice, are in short supply.
Elephant yam has medicinal properties and is used in many Ayurvedic (traditional Hindu) preparations. Severals studies have been done on the properties of this plant. Several experimental studies have been done on the properties of this plant, showing that tuber extract has real antioxidant activity and inhibition of hepatic cell proliferation in cancer, however this has only been proven in experimental protocols with mice.
Other common names: Elephant foot yam, Whitespot giant arum, Stink lily, Telinga potato.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©tpholland | Locality: cultivated - Par, England, UK (2012)

libutron:

The Elephant yam - A striking aroid used as food, fodder and medical

Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Alismatales - Araceae) is a large aroid, which is found throughout Asia. In the wild it is ruderal in habit and grows in a very wide range of moist, semi-shaded to open, secondary and disturbed forests, shrublands, scrubs and grasslands. It is also cultivated as an ornamental for its striking compound foliage and unusual and dramatic flowering and fruiting structures.

The plant produces a single inflorescence (flowering spike) crowned with a bulbous maroon knob and encircled by a fleshy maroon and green-blotched bract. After the growing season, this dies back to an underground storage organ (tuber).

Commonly known as Elephant yam, it is one of the staple food plants of tropical Asia, and is extensively cultivated for its edible tubers, which are the third most important carbohydrate source after rice and maize in Indonesia. They are also consumed widely in India and Sri Lanka, although elsewhere they are seen as a famine crop, to be used when more popular staples, such as rice, are in short supply.

Elephant yam has medicinal properties and is used in many Ayurvedic (traditional Hindu) preparations. Severals studies have been done on the properties of this plant. Several experimental studies have been done on the properties of this plant, showing that tuber extract has real antioxidant activity and inhibition of hepatic cell proliferation in cancer, however this has only been proven in experimental protocols with mice.

Other common names: Elephant foot yam, Whitespot giant arum, Stink lily, Telinga potato.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©tpholland | Locality: cultivated - Par, England, UK (2012)

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under botany

201 notes

dendroica:

Once-Common Marine Birds Disappearing from Our Coast (in Washington State)

Bird surveys like this and others done by plane are tracking a significant ecological shift in our region — a major decline in once-abundant marine birds. From white-winged scoters and surf scoters to long-tailed ducks, murres, loons and some seagulls, the number of everyday marine birds here has plummeted dramatically in recent decades.
Scoters are down more than 75 percent from what they were in the late 1970s. Murres have dropped even more. Western grebes have mostly vanished, falling from several hundred thousand birds to about 20,000.
The reasons often vary — from climate change and shoreline development to marine pollution and the rebound of predators such as bald eagles.
But several new studies now also link many dwindling marine bird populations to what they eat — especially herring, anchovies, sand lance and surf smelt, the tiny swimmers often dubbed forage fish…

(read more: The Seattle Times)

dendroica:

Once-Common Marine Birds Disappearing from Our Coast (in Washington State)

Bird surveys like this and others done by plane are tracking a significant ecological shift in our region — a major decline in once-abundant marine birds. From white-winged scoters and surf scoters to long-tailed ducks, murres, loons and some seagulls, the number of everyday marine birds here has plummeted dramatically in recent decades.

Scoters are down more than 75 percent from what they were in the late 1970s. Murres have dropped even more. Western grebes have mostly vanished, falling from several hundred thousand birds to about 20,000.

The reasons often vary — from climate change and shoreline development to marine pollution and the rebound of predators such as bald eagles.

But several new studies now also link many dwindling marine bird populations to what they eat — especially herring, anchovies, sand lance and surf smelt, the tiny swimmers often dubbed forage fish…

(read more: The Seattle Times)

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under fat bird conservation